More About the Faeries

Fairy Glen, Conway, Wales

Fairy Glen, Conway, Wales

I have written before about real faeries.  But you can never learn too much… and I have learned alot this month from the tales I will will be telling from The Welsh Fairy Book, by W. Jenkyn Thomas.  My roommate found this treasure once at Kaboom Books, and I happened to peruse it once on a rainy afternoon, and… well, let’s just say I learned alot.

Things you should know about Faeries and the Country of Faerie:

Those that have been to Faerie say it is always misty, gray weather there.

Those who have seen faeries usually discover them singing in a ring. Witnesses hear most beautiful music ever, and everyone is dancing.

Entryways to Faeirie are through the earth, through a door in the earth or underground tunnel.

Faerie people are not tiny like pixies, they are human sized… but small, with pale skin and dark hair.

Time is different in Faerie- you may be five minutes there, and five hundred years may have passed here.

Tea time with the Fair Folk

Tea time with the Fair Folk

Faeries are not “bad” or “good” but if you mess with them, you will be sorry.  They can steal your babies and substitute a faery child (changelings), they can take you to Faerie and you’ll never come back, and they can really mess with your cows, goats, butter, milk and basically anything to do with your cottage dairy industry.

Faeries turn into animals, and talk to them, and enchant them to do the faery’s will.

Faeries mostly eat milk flavored with spices, no meat.

Never call them Faeries- you might call one to you!  Just say “Fair Folk” or “Little People” to avoid ticking them off.  I really hope they don’t read blogs.

If they like you, they might shower your life with blessings such as a harp that always plays beautifully, a purse of gold, or a very prosperous cottage dairy industry indeed.

All you need to to make a Faery story are these facts, a mortal who gets into Faery and (hopefully) comes back again.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Let’s Get Real About Faeries

The Procession of the Faeries. By artist Stephanie Law.

The Procession of the Faeries. By artist Stephanie Law.

It’s the time of year for faeries.

In old England and Ireland and Scotland, they used to say the thin veil separating the human world from that of Faerie thins on October 31, and on that night anything is possible.  Our tales this month will be all about the faeries and the little people, but Tinkerbelle and your Disney friends- sorry, ladies, go somewhere else.  We are getting real about faeries this October.  These faeries are the Gaelic kind, the kind who are beautiful but dangerous, who look like humans but whose blood flows ice-cold, who confer good fortune and favor beyond belief, but who might also kidnap children and bring them back to the enchanted realm of Faerie, never to return.  This is the Faerie Land that is the most wonderful place in the world- until you realize that if you go there, you may never get back to this side of the veil.

Fairy mound, Ireland

Fairy mound, Ireland

What better tale to delve into the mysteries of real faeries than Tam Lin?  An old Scottish ballad,  the tale concerns a youth named Tam Lin who is kidnapped by the Faerie Queen and forced to haunt a forest forever more.  When the feisty Janet passes through the enchanted wood, she and Tam Lin fall in love.  But Janet will have to endure quite a few trials to save her love from the magic of the Faerie Queen.

I have adapted the rather, eh, steamy original so it is appropriate for children.  My version here:

tam_lin

And just for kicks, the Scottish original:

Ballad of Tam Lin

We will also tell Snow White and Rose Red.  The Little Person here is not a faerie but a dwarf who is having a very bad hair day (or beard day, I should say).  Two sisters must use their wiles to free yet another enchanted young man from this grouchy creature’s spell.  (This is a Grimm’s tale, so versions of it are easy-peasy to find.)

Snow White and Rose Red. Drawing by Brooke Bailey.

Snow White and Rose Red. Drawing by Brooke Bailey.

Enjoy the tales… but don’t stay out too late on Halloween night!  For it is the night when faeries walk.