A Story for Hurricane Harvey

A Story for Hurricane Harvey

A story and activity for children and parents.  I wanted a Hurricane story to tell my students, but couldn’t find one, so I loosely adapted this from the Chippewa tale Shingebiss.  Themes are endurance, focus on friendships and the positive, and that bad things do end.

My hopes are that the story will help children process their feelings and be comforted.  The activities and especially the inspired free play afterwards is where children can further work out how they feel and also make sense of the event in their own way.

My heart goes out to my city.

click here for the printable pdf:

Story for Hurricane Harvey and Activities: Printable version

(beautiful pictures swiped from this  article)

Once upon a time there lived a little squirrel in a cozy cozy squirrel nest at the top of a big pine tree.  She loved the mockingbird in the tree, the rat who lived in the wall on the house just next to the tree, and the raccoons who lived in the tree next door.  She loved to watch the sun shine through the green pine needles of her tree, and feel it swaying in the breeze to rock her to sleep at night.

But one day, the sun disappeared behind dark clouds.  Her tree began to sway, sway, sway.  The little squirrel was scared.  “It’s a hurricane,” said the mockingbird.

It was true.

Far out in the middle of the sea, there was a tiny raindrop who was very, very angry.  The tiny raindrop was so angry he began to spin and spin and spin.  He had long, long hair, and his hair whipped all around him.  With every spin he grew older and bigger, taller and stronger, stronger,  stronger.

He grew the size of a house. He spun faster.

He grew the size of a mountain.  He spun faster.

He grew to be almost the size of Texas.  He spun faster.  And then, he thought he’d go traveling.

And the whole time, he was spinning.

If you’ve ever spun and spun, you know that you can’t walk very well when you are doing that.  Well, neither could Hurricane Harvey.  Spinning, spinning, not looking where he was going.  He spun all over the land, bumping into things, knocking them down, flooding them.  Now, he couldn’t stop even if he wanted to.

Squirrel was hiding in her cozy nest in her tree.  The mockingbird’s nest blew away, so she huddled in with squirrel.  The tree blew and blew but didn’t fall down.

I don’t care I don’t care

windy hair, windy hair

Spin, spin, spin!

-screamed the Hurricane.

Squirrel sang out:

“You can’t spin forever, your spinning is done.

The sun will come, the sun will come!”

But Hurricane Harvey only laughed, because the sun was no where to be seen.

He blew the tree down.

Now squirrel and mockingbird didn’t have a home.  But the raccoons were passing by in a boat and they pulled their friends on board.  They were safe.

I don’t care I don’t care

windy hair, windy hair

Spin, spin, spin!

Hurricane was still spinning, trying to blow them off the boat.  He was so angry he was crying and his tears made so much rain.

But squirrel sang:

“You can’t spin forever, your spinning is done.

The sun will come, the sun will come!”

The raccoons took their friends to rat’s house.  It was in the wall of a house and the house was still okay.  All the animals huddled together, safe and warm.

I don’t care I don’t care

windy hair, windy hair

Spin, spin, spin!

But Harvey was spinning slower.  He was running out of water.

“I’m tired of spinning,” he sighed.  He was so tired.

The animals sang:

“You can’t spin forever, your spinning is done.

Here comes the Sun.  Here comes the SUN.

The sun will dry up every drop

Spinning, spinning, spinning- STOP.”

 

The sun was coming out.  So golden and strong and full of light.

 

Harvey became tiny.  He became a tiny raindrop again.  He fell down and went to sleep.  He was so tired of spinning.

The water dried up.  The animals helped squirrel find a new tree and they built her a new home.  She helped the raccoons and mockingbird build new nests.  The rat cooked them dinner.  They were safe and warm and so happy to be friends.

And the sun was making a rainbow again.

Snip, snap, snout

Our tale is all told out.

The End

(Here is a puppet show version I made from the story.)

Art Activity:

Draw Harvey

Materials: paper, bigger the better.  Crayons.  Water color.  Can also use glitter, bits of tin foil.

Adult narrator:

“Harvey was like a tiny dot you make with a crayon.

Make tiny scribbles, around and around.  Slowly, slowly.

Now go a little faster…

and a little faster….

Now really really fast!

And slower- the sun is coming.

Slower…

slower…

and…. stop.”

Children can paint over the crayon drawings with watercolor, and decorate with bits of foil or glitter.

 

Movement Activity:

 

Need: small drum or empty wastebasket to be a makeshift drum.  Could also just clap.

Long streams of paper: crepe paper, toilet paper

Flashlight, if you have one.

 

Roles:

-Narrator- adult or older child for the first few times.

-One child to be hurricane.  Hurricane holds long streamers in her hands. (Helpful: to mark out a square or circle with masking tape or designate a rug for Hurricane, so Hurricane knows where her boundaries are and will not hurt herself..)

-One or more child to be Sun. Sun holds the flashlight.

-Extra children can be baby animals, hiding under a table or in some sort of “shelter.”  Stuffed animals can be good props.

 

Hurricane child begins on the floor like a little tiny raindrop.

 

Narrator slowly chants, accompanied by drum or clapping:

 

I don’t care I don’t care

windy hair, windy hair

Spin, spin, spin!

 

Slowly.  “Now the raindrop gets bigger.  Stand up!”

Chant again. Faster.  “Now you are a hurricane!  Go faster!

Chant again, very fast.

 

 

Chanter stops drumming.  Sun child comes out and shines flashlight on Hurricane child.

Chanter says:

 

“You can’t spin forever, your spinning is done.

Here comes the Sun.  Here comes the SUN.

 

The sun will dry up every drop

Spinning, spinning, spinning- STOP.”

 

“Fall to the ground now Hurricane!  You are finished!”

 

The end.

 

Repeat until children lose interest, then let them loose with toilet paper, the shelter, and the flashlight and let them free play!

Spooky Mexican Stories for October

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Sugar Skull Season!!!!

All the sugar skulls are starting to sparkle and glow around Houston!  I was inspired to mine Mexico and the Amercian Southwest for my story treasures this month.  Joe Hayes was a wonderful local storyteller here in Texas who left us a great legacy of Hispanic stories he collected and retold, mostly from New Mexico.  I am a huge fan of his books The Day it Snowed Tortillas, and also The Coyote Under the Table.

The kids had such fun hearing “If I Were an Eagle,” which is just a hands-down straight-up classically awesome fairy tale: a giant, kids on a quest, magic and changing into animals.  The kids had a lot of fun designing “costumes” for the animals they would like to turn into and then acting out the story in their own way.

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I’ve also really wanted to tell La Llonora for a couple of years.  I have hesitated because the story is… very scary.  I asked Mexican and Latino friends if they heard the tale as kids, and if hearing it traumatized them.  All of them had grown up with the tale, but didn’t seem any more damaged than I was by “Hansel and Gretel.”  That is, it was rather deliciously scary, but nobody was in therapy because they heard it.

Much scarier seemed to be El Cuco, who is sort of like the Mexican boogeyman.  He doesn’t have a narrtive story, but seems to be sort of this mysterious essence of malevolence that will simply come and GET you if you are bad.  My friends said he is used as a scare tactic to make kids behave in some families.  He seemed really threatening, so I’m going to stay away from telling that one.

Woman Hollering Creek, possibly named for La Llorona, on I10 West towards San Antonio.

Woman Hollering Creek, possibly named for La Llorona, on I10 West towards San Antonio.

Why would I tell scary tales to children?  I believe fairy tales in their original scary forms have their uses.  Kids can encounter darkness and fear in stories in small doses that they can handle, in a safe and protected environment.  When fear comes in real life (and it always will), kids have already had an emotional dress rehearsal, so to speak.  Fear is not quite so scary.  They already know dragons can be overcome, and Lloronas can be escaped.

La Llonora

La Llonora

I’m including some YouTube links of Joe Hayes storytelling these spooky tales (I will tell them a bit differently, but he really is a master!)

NOTE: Mr. Hayes was performing to elementary school-aged children.  I would strongly advise these videos for kids of 5 or 6 years and older.   If your child is highly sensitive, I would preview first.

 

 

 

 

Shadow Puppets in the World of Hans Christian Andersen

A SunBee mom lent me a lovely new edition of  The Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen.  (Anyone who knows my love of vintage illustration will realize why I love this book!)  It’s also available at the Jung Center bookstore in Houston.  We are immersing ourselves in “The Ugly Duckling” and “Thumbelina” in SunBee this month.  Both are tales of a highly sensitive being who doesn’t fit in, but come spring time, each finds their place in the world.

fish_bright

Thumblina (Illustration by Brooke Bailey)

Andersen’s tales are richly visual and have inspired many artists including myself.  So it seemed like a good time to try shadow puppets with the kids, which I have always wanted to do ever since learning the technique from artist Justin Dunford at Gina Vazquez’s wonderfully creative summer camp Flor y Canto several summers ago.  Justin’s materials were very simple: the sort of thin cardboard cereal boxes are made of, tape, and those very thin shish kebab sticks.  Because my kids are much younger than the kids at that camp, I used straws (less poky), animal foam stickers, doilies, and some stencils for the kids to trace.

You draw or trace your character on the cardboard, cut it out, and tape it on a straw.  So much for puppets.

For the theater, I used a packing box and white paper, and duct tape for the edges.  I got the idea from this link about how to make a simple theater. The only thing I changed: I kept a sort of “frame” around the “screen” to prevent the whole box from flopping over and taking a nap mid-performance.

 

 

The kids enjoyed this so much one rainy afternoon that we will be working on it all of March!  To the stage!

Friend. (Thumbelina illustration by Brooke Bailey)

Oh, Those Russians

Oh, snap!  SunBee friends, I am posting my January stories at the beginning of February!  That’s all right, because we have a bit more cold weather before us, and that is just perfect for Russian tales.  Also, I have the wonderful opportunity to share with you the kids’ reactions to these stories, as we have been telling them all month.

I focused on two Russian tales.  The first is the Firebird, also called Ivan, Firebird and Gray Wolf in the version I used.  This is appropriate because while the Firebird is a beautiful prize, the true heart of the tale is the young tsarevich Ivan’s relationship with Gray Wolf.  Gray Wolf can be dangerous if he wants to, but he chooses to help Ivan and oh, what a powerful, crafty, and wise friend to have on your side.

Gray Wolf by SunBee student

Gray Wolf by SunBee student

The children were fascinated by Gray Wolf.  I found this to be an especially popular story with boys: a youngest son, a difficult quest, and a REALLY badass helper on your side.  “This is the best story EVER,” declared one six year old.  (And he’s kind of a tough customer, I can tell you.)

Firebird in the Garden, by SunBee student

Firebird in the Garden, by SunBee student

I wanted a story with a girl protagonist after that, and remembered an image from a book I bought in college at a little Russian shop in a snowy street in Manhattan some fifteen years ago.  A young woman in a dark woods with a lighted skull… Vasalissa.

Vasalissa by Ivan Bilibin, circa 1900

Vasalissa by Ivan Bilibin, circa 1900

The story came up again recently when I was reading the incredible Women who Run with the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes.  A version of Vasalissa is in that book, and it really called to me.  Here is another story about a neglected young person.  Like Ivan, the pretty people in Vasalissa’s world are mean as rats, and the terrible scary being in the forest (in this case, the witch Baba Yaga) ends up being a powerful friend.  The children were fascinated by the descriptions of Baba Yaga’s house (that it stands on chicken legs and dances around is only the beginning!) We were stuck inside that day because of rain, and they were cranking out drawing after drawing of Vasalissa, the dark forest, the wise but wild witch.

Russian stories seem to me to have such a wealth of gorgeous visual images: the Firebird at night in a king’s garden, the girl with the skull in the woods, the yellow eyes of Gray Wolf, the broom of the witch made from the hair of “someone long dead.”  How delightful for these cold winter nights!  Enjoy.

PS. The following is, ahem, not for kids, but a special treat for you.  Rah rah!  Oh, those Russians…

Starring Squirrel Nutkin

 

Squirrel Nutkin being silly

Squirrel Nutkin being silly

Our puppet show this month will be an adaptation of Squirrel Nutkin by Beatrix Potter.

I love this story- and all of the tales of Beatrix Potter- for their rebel spirit.  If I ever become the leader of a punk band, I shall blame it on the influence of none other than Miss Beatrix Potter.  In her stories there is often a good little animal, like Flopsy & Co. in Peter Rabbit.  And then there is a naughty character, like Peter, who goes where he shouldn’t, and acts up, and breaks rules, and gets consequences- but oh, some fun is had.  I like Nutkin because, like many kids, he pushes the envelope on silly behavior to see how much attention he can get from a big old boring authority figure.  In fact he goes almost too far- but not quite.

Nutkin and Twinkleberry

Nutkin and Twinkleberry

In adapting this for a puppet show for American children, I substituted Potter’s delicious riddles for a simpler rhyme.  This is because the riddles are oh so British and to me they work better for any American, child or adult, when puzzled over in a book, rather than try to follow them in a puppet show.  But if you have never read this gem of a story (I never did, actually, until I was an adult) I certainly recommend it, especially for those delightful riddles!

Here is the original book:

The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

Mr. Brown

Mr. Brown

My own adapted version for a puppet show can be found here:

nutkin

There is also a lovely song about Squirrel Nutkin with lyrics by F.B. Wood.  I found a lovely link on YouTube for the tune.  Here are the words:

Squirrel Nutkin has a coat so brown

Quite the loveliest in Woodland Town.

Two bright eyes look round to see

Where the sweetest nuts might be.

And the tune (Charming British accent optional):

 

Let’s Get Real About Faeries

The Procession of the Faeries. By artist Stephanie Law.

The Procession of the Faeries. By artist Stephanie Law.

It’s the time of year for faeries.

In old England and Ireland and Scotland, they used to say the thin veil separating the human world from that of Faerie thins on October 31, and on that night anything is possible.  Our tales this month will be all about the faeries and the little people, but Tinkerbelle and your Disney friends- sorry, ladies, go somewhere else.  We are getting real about faeries this October.  These faeries are the Gaelic kind, the kind who are beautiful but dangerous, who look like humans but whose blood flows ice-cold, who confer good fortune and favor beyond belief, but who might also kidnap children and bring them back to the enchanted realm of Faerie, never to return.  This is the Faerie Land that is the most wonderful place in the world- until you realize that if you go there, you may never get back to this side of the veil.

Fairy mound, Ireland

Fairy mound, Ireland

What better tale to delve into the mysteries of real faeries than Tam Lin?  An old Scottish ballad,  the tale concerns a youth named Tam Lin who is kidnapped by the Faerie Queen and forced to haunt a forest forever more.  When the feisty Janet passes through the enchanted wood, she and Tam Lin fall in love.  But Janet will have to endure quite a few trials to save her love from the magic of the Faerie Queen.

I have adapted the rather, eh, steamy original so it is appropriate for children.  My version here:

tam_lin

And just for kicks, the Scottish original:

Ballad of Tam Lin

We will also tell Snow White and Rose Red.  The Little Person here is not a faerie but a dwarf who is having a very bad hair day (or beard day, I should say).  Two sisters must use their wiles to free yet another enchanted young man from this grouchy creature’s spell.  (This is a Grimm’s tale, so versions of it are easy-peasy to find.)

Snow White and Rose Red. Drawing by Brooke Bailey.

Snow White and Rose Red. Drawing by Brooke Bailey.

Enjoy the tales… but don’t stay out too late on Halloween night!  For it is the night when faeries walk.

Mice are Sinners, Too

Our sweet puppet show this year is a German fairy tale I first saw performed by Connie Manson of Starlite Puppets  at the  Sunbridge Institute, and it’s so cute I’m shamelessly copying her!

I like this tale because although the cat did wrong and took the mouse’s tail, the mouse is not an angel either.  He had to promise to stop nibbling Farmer’s grain before he can finally get his tail back from cat.

Be we ever so small, cute and innocent, none of us are without flaws- not even mice!

Here’s a pdf of the story if you would like to use it at home with your little mouse 🙂

The Mouse Who Wanted her Tail Back

cat puppet by Amaruska

cat puppet by Amaruska

PS.  I love puppets but I’m not the craftiest.  I guess I really mean I never seem to have the time.  This story is easy to do with stuffed animals, and you can get toy mice for cats at the pet store to be the mouse.  Or you can get adorable creatures like the one pictured at Amaruska.

Story from the River, Story from the Sea

Did you know that one of the most famous Japanese warriors of all time is called Peach Boy?

It’s true.  An old man and woman find a giant peach, and when it opens, inside is a little baby whom they name Peach Boy, or Momotaro.  Momotaro grows to be a fearless youth who takes it upon himself to teach the mean ogres in the mountain next door a lesson.  Although in the story Peach Boy is around 15, I made him into a younger child for our puppet show.  It just tickled me pink peach how a tough little warrior is called, not Superman, not Ironman, not Hulk, but Peach Boy.  YEAH!

Peach Boy is a bad*$#, as seen by this statue standing in Okayama, Japan.  Photo by jumbokedama on Flickr.

Peach Boy is a bad*$#, as seen by this statue standing in Okayama, Japan. Photo by jumbokedama on Flickr.

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The kind old couple finds a baby boy in a giant peach.

Tale of the Oki Islands (The Legend of Tokoyo)

Our oral story inspiration this June also comes from sea-encircled islands of Japan.  A young girl Tokoyo is the kind of strong girl hero I love to find in old stories.  An excellent pearl diver, Tokoyo sacrifices herself to save another girl and journeys to the bottom of the sea.  There she meets the Dragon King, and battles him when all others have given up hope.

I wish I could credit this lovely picture.  I think it's from Studio Ghibli.

I wish I could credit this lovely picture. I think it’s from Studio Ghibli.

Both of these tales were found in my trusty copy of Best-Loved Folktales of the World by Joanna Cole.  But many Japanese tales can also be found on the website Kids’ Web Japan, if you’re into ogres, tanukis and toothpick warriors… and who isn’t?

SunBee Circle in Summer at Ervan Chew Park

This hot, hot June SunBee Circle will have a new time and new location.  Our Friday class for mixed ages (2-8) will take place at the Ervan Chew Park on Dunlavy, a few blocks south of Richmond.  This park has a gazebo, picnic tables, a playground, and most importantly a splash pad for cooling off!  We will enjoy a lot of watery activities inspired by Tokoyo, Dragon King and Peach Boy.  We will also have a new time of 10-11 AM- all the better to cool us with, my dear!

See you there!

Genie vs. Jinni and the real story of Aladdin

This April we will be dusting off our magic carpets and journeying to Iran… but since we’re going back in time as well, we could also say Persia.  We are flying far beyond Disney to discover the original Aladdin tale from A Thousand and One Arabian Nights.

Is this the Queen of Storytellers, Scheherazade?  Let's pretend it is!

Is this the Queen of Storytellers, Scheherazade? Let’s pretend it is!

I’m guessing that almost all the SunBee kids are familiar with Disney’s Aladdin.  There’s so many great things about that funny and sparkly film, but I never really loved it for one reason- it talks over the kids’ heads.  It was the first of many animations for children that did so,  and after Aladdin, from Shrek to Dispicable Me, almost all films for children have this kind of irony.  In Disney’s Aladdin, Genie makes many cultural references and jokes that are for the parents and not for the kids.  I think that on some level the children feel this.  Irony makes for a story that stands outside itself and doesn’t really take itself seriously.  The stakes are lower.  Much lower than in earlier films such as Disney’s Snow White, for example- nobody is laughing at that witch skulking in the swamps with a blood-bright apple.  The villain in Aladdin is a touch ridiculous and we are never in awe of the genie- although he is funny and endearing, he has no mystery.

No.

No.

At SunBee Circle we learn where stories come from, how they are thousands of years old sometimes, that the real versions are often darker and more magical and more complex than the Americanized versions and there are so many cultures other than our own.  In the real Aladdin, the villian is a seriously powerful magician.  The genie is a jinni! (I just think that spelling is more dazzling).  A jinni in Islamic lore is somewhere between an angel and a human.  They are spirits of fire.  Like humans, they can choose to be bad or good so you have to be a bit on your guard when you find one.

Yes.  The original jinni may look like a little devil but can be bad or good, just like a person.

Yes. The original jinni may look like the Western idea of a little devil but can be bad or good, just like a person.

SunBee Circle always has an activity after the story to encourage dramatic play.  What potential Aladdin has!  We will play dress-up with old clothes (not the ready-made kind- we like to use our imaginations!)  We will choose treasures from a magic chest.  We might try to tell stories like Scheherazade or use vinegar to transform tarnished pennies into golden coins.  The possibilities are endless with this one!

Although you can find Aladdin in any translation of One Thousand and One Arabian Nights,  this famous and beloved collection is not particularly a children’s book.  I really like Best-Loved Folktales of the World by Joanna Cole for reading aloud to children.  It’s a great collection of diverse tales and all of them are appropriate for little ones, so you won’t be merrily reading aloud and stumble onto, um, an extremely bawdy passage!

folktales

 

Underdogs, Monsters and Ducks: Oh My!

This February features two stories about underdogs who come out on top.  For our little ones, we will have a puppet show based on the Chippewa tale Shingebiss.  Shingebiss is a little duck who has to fish through ice in winter.  But no matter how North Wind blows, Shingebiss can survive.

You can find this story for free online here: Shingebiss and the North Wind

There’s also a wonderful picture book version by Nancy Van Laan.

golem

Golem

 

Our big kids will be hearing about a whole community of underdogs who work together to free themselves from oppressors.  Part Frankenstein story, part Trojan Horse,  The Golem of Prague concerns a Jewish community whose very existence is in threat by the Holy Roman Emperor.  A clever Rabbi forms a giant monster-man out of clay and brings it to life to protect the community… but not all goes as planned.

Our big kids will be forming their own golem out of boxes and tape, and we will see what their inventive minds can create!

For those that want to learn more about golems: Stories of the Golem of Prague.

 

*A word about religion in SunBee Circle:

SunBee Circle is a secular teaching style.  But because we hear stories from all around the world, sometimes religions surface.  Children are never told what to believe but they do learn that Navajo people in Arizona pray to the Great Spirit, that there are Zen temples in Japan, Hansel and Gretel in a fairytale Europe pray to a Christian god for help, and that the Jewish people keep the Sabbath as a holy day.  The idea to tell the story of The Golem of Prague was inspired by the 70th anniversary this week of the liberation of Auschwitz.  I believe stories can heal, and that learning the values and customs of another culture through a story sows wonderful seeds of peace.

Hear some grown-up stories about the liberation of Auschwitz here.

Jewish Cemetery, Prague

Jewish Cemetery, Prague